Sacred Sites Archive

In search of Middle England

Feature Articles –   In search of Middle England Rather than go in search of the mythical Middle Earth, for thousands of years, people have tried to locate the centre of England. Retracing their steps reveals how accurate our ancestors were in mapping the island, accomplishing an almost impossible task with apparently no scientific instruments. by Philip Coppens In the eight century, the Venerable Bede identified …

Otherworldly Capitals

Feature Articles –   Otherworldly Capitals Two capitals, London and Washington, were (re)designed in the 17th and 18th century so that they would incorporate the so-called Tree of Life, a divine design, which would hopefully allow the nations’ rulers to synchronize their worldly ambitions with those of the Divine Realm. by Philip Coppens After the Great Fire that swept London in 1666, the leading geniuses of …

The Stone of Destiny: sacred kingship in the 21st century

Feature Articles –   The Stone of Destiny: sacred kingship in the 21st century The Scottish Stone of Scone – or Stone of Destiny – is probably one of the most famous and only remaining reminders of ancient and sacred kingship. by Philip Coppens Every story has a beginning. But this story, may have several. And it may have several endings. The “Stone of Destiny”, the …

Avebury-Stonehenge: a scale model of Atlantis?

Feature Articles –   Avebury-Stonehenge: a scale model of Atlantis? Few have looked at Avebury and Stonehenge, pondering whether they might be part of a larger complex. But when that question is asked, an altogether different one bubbles to the surface: could this complex also be linked with Plato’s fabled lost civilisation of Atlantis? by Philip Coppens Without any doubt, Stonehenge is the most famous megalithic …

St Edmund’s Masonic Church

Feature Articles –   St Edmund’s Masonic Church Labelled by experts as a “temple to Freemasonry” and “a total concept as exotic as Roslin Chapel in Scotland”, St Edmund’s Church in Rochdale (Greater Manchester) is one of England’s hidden gems. So much so, that it is totally unknown. by Philip Coppens St. Edmund’s Church, off Falinge Road in Rochdale – now largely seen as a suburb …

Standing, walking and sailing with stones

Feature Articles    Standing, walking and sailing with stones Henry Lincoln’s son makes a pilgrimage across the British Isles, underlining how little we know about its megalithic past. Islands in Amnesia? by Philip Coppens In “Mankind in Amnesia”, Immanuel Velikovsky argued that “virtually every aspect of human behaviour, every pattern in human history, and every article of human belief, if examined and illuminated in the …

The Scottish Grail castle ?

Feature Articles –   The Scottish Grail castle ? Is there any chance that the famed Grail castle is not in France, but instead is located in Scotland? If one follows the Arthurian tradition, rather than the traditions of the Grail, that is apparently where one ends up. by Philip Coppens The Grail. A story dating from the 12th and early 13th century, a story which …

Round towers: lanterns of the dead

Feature Articles –   Round towers: lanterns of the dead The Irish round towers are enigmatic constructions: refuges, belfries or “needles” in the system of leylines have all been proposed as their true purpose. Could it be, however, that they were beacons for the souls of the dead? by Philip Coppens Round Tower of Glendalough One of the lesser known, though widely referenced “mysteries” of Ireland …

Royston Cave: creating a medieval magical centre

Feature Articles –   Royston Cave: creating a medieval magical centre The underground cave of Royston, sitting as it does at the crossroads of the town, has created a lot of interest and controversy. Is it, as some suggest, a medieval Templar church or is it instead one part of a larger pagan landscape, whereby a sacred centre was created? by Philip Coppens Soon after the …

The Rushton Rebus

Feature Articles –   The Rushton Rebus Rushton Lodge – better known as the Triangular Lodge – is considered by many to be a folly – a building without a real purpose. But the history of the structure is more than interesting, inviting the question whether it might not actually contain a veritable secret message, so far not uncovered. by Philip Coppens What happens when you …